Thursday, December 31, 2009

Newt Gingrich: Impeach judges - Crush and Replace the Left - 2012 "Victory or Death!"

I LIKE WHAT I HEAR ... AND HE HAS MY FULL SUPPORT!!!

NORTHWEST AIRLINES TERRORIST ATTACK ... TIMELINE

JERRY LEE LEWIS, CHEWING QAT, OBAMA'S HERITAGE

The devout Muslim, Abdulmutallab's underwear is missing its fruit of the loom ..., who attempted to take down the plane with a bomb had the device hooked up to his family jewels.  It will be interesting to see the ever astute TSA tackle this new security problem.   In the meantime lets cut away for a bit of song.

INFLATION TREND

This is a creative use of Dipity, an story development application, to follow news, video, and other media on a particular topic.  The Dipity application is free and can be used to create a timeline for any subject you desire, the only limit is your imagination.


Wednesday, December 30, 2009

COLOR BLIND AND DEAF ... OBAMA'S ADMINISTRATION SHOULD TRAIN DOGS!!!

Terrorist can count on our top government officials ignoring blinking red warnings, as the Bush White House did before 9/11, or the alarm of a well-connected and properly concerned Nigerian banker-father.  


The following links are two different sources which are interesting ... 

Sunday, December 27, 2009

MYTH, DREAM, REALITY OR NIGHTMARE ...

SINS OF CAMELOT ... OBAMA ADMINISTRATION'S IDEOLOGUES WILL REALIZE THEIR ERRORS(?) ... WILL IT BE TOO LATE FOR THE NEW CONGRESS(?) ... OR HAS THE DIE BEEN CAST?

OCTOBER 2010 ... TRICK OR TREAT ... NO, NO, ... LIE TO ME ... MID-TERM SPIN MACHINE CRANKED UP!


The final debate

By John Del Cecato 12/17/09 05:33 PM ET
December is typically a month for looking backward — a time to take account of the year as it draws to an end. But before members of Congress immerse themselves in 2009’s top 10 news stories or 100 most outrageous celebrity moments, they should look to the year ahead.
October, to be specific.


That’s when the final candidate debates of the midterm elections will be televised. Chances are there will be a question or two about health reform. 

For the sake of argument, let’s assume the legislation passes. Candidates won’t be debating the theoretical, but the empirical. After nine or 10 months under the new law, Americans will see for themselves whether reform was worthwhile or not. 

What will have changed? First, it will be illegal for insurance companies to limit the coverage that patients can receive in a lifetime. Preventive care will be fully covered. Americans will no longer lose their coverage just because they get sick. Seniors will pay less out of pocket for prescription drugs.

But just as important is what voters will not see happen. Contrary to the breathless warnings by insurance companies and their Republican allies, those who like their current plan won’t be forced to leave it; nor will they forfeit their choice of doctor. Grandma’s life will not be cut short by the heartless verdict of a government death panel. And Medicare recipients won’t see their benefits shredded to help pay for massage therapy or acupuncture for illegal immigrants.

Desperate to protect the status quo, Republicans suggest that voters are with them. Indeed, an ABC News-Washington Post survey this week found that respondents, based on what they know now, oppose the president’s health reform plan by a seven-point margin. That matches the results of a private survey I saw recently. 

But polling can only tell us where voters are now, not where they will be next fall. Many Americans aren’t going to pledge their support for legislation that’s still a work in progress. Their default position may be opposition, but they hold out hope that their concerns will be addressed before a final vote is taken.

If you’re shopping for a new car, walking out of the showroom doesn’t mean you’ve given up the dream of getting that new ride. You may just be hoping the dealer reconsiders your bid for a free sunroof or seat-warmer.

That’s why the private survey dug deeper. And undecided Democrats should take note. 

When asked whether they’d support a Democratic congressional candidate who backed reform or a Republican candidate who opposed it, voters chose the generic Democrat by a six-point margin. But when asked if they’d support a Democratic candidate who opposed reform or a Republican who also opposed it — guess what? Voters chose the Republican by a 14-point margin. 

Why such a dramatic shift? To paraphrase a quote attributed to Harry Truman, when voters have a choice between a Republican and a Democrat imitating a Republican, they’ll go with the real thing.
As Congress moves towards its last, best chance to reform our healthcare system, candidates should bear something in mind.  Voters will be watching that debate next October. And given a choice between a defender of the status quo and a politician imitating one, they may just go with the real thing.

Del Cecato is a partner at AKPD Message and Media, the political consulting firm founded by David Axelrod in 1985. He served as media adviser and admaker for Obama for America and Obama-Biden 2008.

Saturday, December 26, 2009

A SIMPLE MAN OF COMMON SENSE ... A WARNING OR PROPHECY?

Jim Rogers president of Rogers Holdings is George Soros former partner and co-founder of the Quantum Fund, and a truly legendary international investor who helped generate a 4,200% total return over a 10-year period .Jim Rogers is always bullish on Asia Commodities Agricultural Products gold and silver.

Thursday, December 24, 2009

THE NEW AARP ... EASY TO JOIN ... TRY IT!

The New AARP
Yep, the heck with the ultra liberal old AARP.
(American Association for Retired People).
HOW DARE THEY SAY THEY SPEAK FOR SENIORS!!!
I joined the NEW AARP.

Let me get this straight. Obama's health care plan will be written by a committee whose Chairman says he doesn't understand it, passed by a Congress which hasn't read it, signed by a President who smokes, funded by a Treasury Chief who did not pay his taxes, overseen by a Surgeon General who is obese, and financed by a country that is nearly broke.
What could possibly go wrong?

Wednesday, December 23, 2009

CBO ESTIMATES BASED ON 'NEFARIOUS ASSUMPTIONS' ... $$$

Morici Says Health Care Bill, CBO Estimates Based on 'Nefarious' Assumptions
Maryland economist says 'reform' bill will cost 'typical American family' up to $2,000 more for coverage.

By Julia A. Seymour
Business & Media Institute
12/22/2009 4:16:24 PM 



While Senate Democrats scurry to pass an unpopular health care reform bill by Christmas Eve, CNN did something rare on Dec. 22: they offered two different perspectives on the bill, including a critic’s view.


That critic was University of Maryland economist Peter Morici, who expressed skepticism of the assumptions built into the health care reform bill, projected that it would raise costs for many average families and it would add “substantially” the federal deficit.
 
“There’s a lot of assumptions in this bill that are kind of nefarious, uh, and I believe that the typical American family will pay $1,000 to $2,000 more for coverage for a family of four,” Morici said.

The professor also provided an example of one of those assumptions saying, “This bill assumes that costs will go down. For example, it’s gonna cut Medicare reimbursements next year by 21 percent. That’s absurd! That’s not going to happen.  The history of these things tells us that.”

 A study from the Pacific Research Institutefound that since 1970, the cost of Medicare has risen 34 percent more per patient “than the combined costs of all health care in Americaapart from Medicare and Medicaid.”

Morici’s counterpart in the discussion was Kenneth Thorpe, chair of the Dept. of Health Policy & Management at Emory University, who claimed 18 million self-employed individuals would pay “about 60 percent less” with the bill.

Co-anchor Kiran Chetry asked Morici who the winners and losers would be under the Senate bill. Morici agreed with Thorpe that individuals without group coverage would be helped by the legislation, but said “the losers are typically moderate income – maybe make $40,000 to $100,000 – have group coverage with their employer.”

“The cost of that coverage will go up quite substantially and either their employer will pay them less or charge them more,” Morici concluded.
The Business & Media Institute has followed the news media’s treatment of health care reform all year and found that the cost of reform is frequently ignored by journalists. On the networks, only 20 percent of stories referenced cost estimates of $1 trillion or higher (The CBO put a $1.6 trillion price tag on the bill). The networks also ignored Medicare’s “explosive fiscal situation,” even in stories about a Medicare-like public option.

PINK SLIP 2010 SOLUTION ... ARE YOU UP TO IT?

2010 SOLUTION

Take  a look at this and just
 remember elections in  Nov. 2010.
 
U.S.  House & Senate have voted  themselves $4,700  and $5,300 raises, respectively ...

1.  They  voted to 
not give  you a  S.S. Cost of living raise in 2010 and  2011.

2.  Your  Medicaid premiums will 
go up $285.60 for  the 2-years and You will not get the 3% COLA:  $660/yr. Your total 2-yr loss  and cost is -$1,600  or -$3,200 for  husband and  wife.

3.   Over  
2-yrs Congress  each get  $10,000
4.   Do  you feel  SCREWED?  You were!

5.   
Will  they have your cost of drugs - doctor fees -  local taxes - food, etc.,  decrease?  NO  WAY!  They have a raise their better benefits. Why care  about you? You never did anything about it in  the past.   Were you  too stupid or don't  care.

6..   Do  you really think that Nancy, Harry, Chris,  Charlie , Barnie, and Al, care about  you? 
 SEND THE  MESSAGE-- You're  FIRED.. IN  2010 YOU WILL HAVE A CHANCE TO GET RID OF THE  SITTING CONGRESS who did all of this.


 MAKE  SURE YOU'RE STILL MAD  IN NOVEMBER  2010 AND  REMIND THEIR REPLACEMENTS NOT TO SCREW  UP. It  is ok to forward this to  your sphere  of influence if you are finally  tired of the  abuse.
 
Maybe  it's time for the........ Amendment  28
 
"Congress shall  make no law that applies to the citizens of the  United States that does  not apply equally to the Senators or  Representatives, and Congress  shall make no law that applies to the Senators or Representatives that does not apply equally to the citizens of the United States." Let's  get this passed around, folks - these people in Washington have brought this upon themselves."  It's time for retribution.  Let's take back America.

GOD imposes 'term limits' on life ... congress imposed 'term limits' on the Office of President, ... so its time to impose 'term limits' on congress!!!
 
If you don't forward this link to all your friends so they can read this, then you're just part of the problem of national apathy.

Monday, December 21, 2009

HOW TO FIT A SQUARE PEG IN A ROUND HOLE ... AND LOSE 2010 ELECTIONS


THE LAST STEP IN THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS IS RECONCILIATION OF THE HOUSE AN SENATE BILLS ... EACH BILL HAS OPPOSING ISSUES ... THESE MUST BE RESOLVED ... DID YOU EVER WONDER HOW THE PROCESS IS COMPLETED.  

Reconciliation is a legislative process of the United States Senate intended to allow a contentious budget bill to be considered without being subject to filibuster. Because reconciliation limits debate and amendment, the process empowers the majority party. Reconciliation also applies in the United States House of Representatives, but since the House regularly passes rules that constrain debate and amendment, the reconciliation process represented less of a change in that body.
reconciliation instruction (Budget Reconciliation) is a provision in a budget resolution directing one or more committees to submit legislation changing existing law in order to bring spending, revenues, or the debt-limit into conformity with the budget resolution. The instructions specify the committees to which they apply, indicate the appropriate dollar changes to be achieved, and usually provide a deadline by which the legislation is to be reported or submitted.[1]
reconciliation bill is one containing changes in law recommended pursuant to reconciliation instructions in a budget resolution. If the instructions pertain to only one committee in a chamber, that committee reports the reconciliation bill. If the instructions pertain to more than one committee, the House Budget Committee reports an omnibus reconciliation bill, but it may not make substantive changes in the recommendations of the other committees.[2]

Sunday, December 20, 2009

THE GREAT AMERICAN HEALTH CARE AUCTION

THE PROBLEM IS THAT THE POST OFFICE WALL IS TOO SMALL FOR ALL THE WANTED POSTERS OF SENATORS AND CONGRESSMAN & WOMAN ...


SOLD: Sen. Ben Nelson to vote for health care bill; Secured favors for his home state...
SOLD ... JOE LIEBERMAN ... SELLS OUT STATE AND AMERICAN PUBLIC

SOLD ... 


In his weekend address, Mr Obama said: "Now - for the first time - there is a clear majority in the Senate that's willing to stand up to the insurance lobby and embrace lasting health insurance reforms that have eluded us for generations."




 Dems Own It...

Saturday, December 19, 2009

THE NATIONAL MEAT GRINDER ... MAKING SAUSAGE IS MESSY

THE SAUSAGE CALCULATORS ...
http://www.federalbudget.com/
http://www.shadowstats.com/


The New York Times
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November 23, 2009
PAYBACK TIME

Wave of Debt Payments Facing U.S. Government

WASHINGTON — The United States government is financing its more than trillion-dollar-a-year borrowing with i.o.u.’s on terms that seem too good to be true.

But that happy situation, aided by ultralow interest rates, may not last much longer.

Treasury officials now face a trifecta of headaches: a mountain of new debt, a balloon of short-term borrowings that come due in the months ahead, and interest rates that are sure to climb back to normal as soon as the Federal Reserve decides that the emergency has passed.

Even as Treasury officials are racing to lock in today’s low rates by exchanging short-term borrowings for long-term bonds, the government faces a payment shock similar to those that sent legions of overstretched homeowners into default on their mortgages.

With the national debt now topping $12 trillion, the White House estimates that the government’s tab for servicing the debt will exceed $700 billion a year in 2019, up from $202 billion this year, even if annual budget deficits shrink drastically. Other forecasters say the figure could be much higher.

In concrete terms, an additional $500 billion a year in interest expense would total more than the combined federal budgets this year for education, energy, homeland security and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The potential for rapidly escalating interest payouts is just one of the wrenching challenges facing the United States after decades of living beyond its means.

The surge in borrowing over the last year or two is widely judged to have been a necessary response to the financial crisis and the deep recession, and there is still a raging debate over how aggressively to bring down deficits over the next few years. But there is little doubt that the United States’ long-term budget crisis is becoming too big to postpone.

Americans now have to climb out of two deep holes: as debt-loaded consumers, whose personal wealth sank along with housing and stock prices; and as taxpayers, whose government debt has almost doubled in the last two years alone, just as costs tied to benefits for retiring baby boomers are set to explode.

The competing demands could deepen political battles over the size and role of the government, the trade-offs between taxes and spending, the choices between helping older generations versus younger ones, and the bottom-line questions about who should ultimately shoulder the burden.

“The government is on teaser rates,” said Robert Bixby, executive director of the Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan group that advocates lower deficits. “We’re taking out a huge mortgage right now, but we won’t feel the pain until later.”

So far, the demand for Treasury securities from investors and other governments around the world has remained strong enough to hold down the interest rates that the United States must offer to sell them. Indeed, the government paid less interest on its debt this year than in 2008, even though it added almost $2 trillion in debt.

The government’s average interest rate on new borrowing last year fell below 1 percent. For short-term i.o.u.’s like one-month Treasury bills, its average rate was only sixteen-hundredths of a percent.

“All of the auction results have been solid,” said Matthew Rutherford, the Treasury’s deputy assistant secretary in charge of finance operations. “Investor demand has been very broad, and it’s been increasing in the last couple of years.”

The problem, many analysts say, is that record government deficits have arrived just as the long-feared explosion begins in spending on benefits under Medicare and Social Security. The nation’s oldest baby boomers are approaching 65, setting off what experts have warned for years will be a fiscal nightmare for the government.

“What a good country or a good squirrel should be doing is stashing away nuts for the winter,” said William H. Gross, managing director of the Pimco Group, the giant bond-management firm. “The United States is not only not saving nuts, it’s eating the ones left over from the last winter.”

The current low rates on the country’s debt were caused by temporary factors that are already beginning to fade. One factor was the economic crisis itself, which caused panicked investors around the world to plow their money into the comparative safety of Treasury bills and notes. Even though the United States was the epicenter of the global crisis, investors viewed Treasury securities as the least dangerous place to park their money.

On top of that, the Fed used almost every tool in its arsenal to push interest rates down even further. It cut the overnight federal funds rate, the rate at which banks lend reserves to one another, to almost zero. And to reduce longer-term rates, it bought more than $1.5 trillion worth of Treasury bonds and government-guaranteed securities linked to mortgages.

Those conditions are already beginning to change. Global investors are shifting money into riskier investments like stocks and corporate bonds, and they have been pouring money into fast-growing countries like Brazil and China.

The Fed, meanwhile, is already halting its efforts at tamping down long-term interest rates. Fed officials ended their $300 billion program to buy up Treasury bonds last month, and they have announced plans to stop buying mortgage-backed securities by the end of next March. Eventually, though probably not until at least mid-2010, the Fed will also start raising its benchmark interest rate back to more historically normal levels.

The United States will not be the only government competing to refinance huge debt. Japan, Germany, Britain and other industrialized countries have even higher government debt loads, measured as a share of their gross domestic product, and they too borrowed heavily to combat the financial crisis and economic downturn. As the global economy recovers and businesses raise capital to finance their growth, all that new government debt is likely to put more upward pressure on interest rates.

Even a small increase in interest rates has a big impact. An increase of one percentage point in the Treasury’s average cost of borrowing would cost American taxpayers an extra $80 billion this year — about equal to the combined budgets of the Department of Energy and theDepartment of Education.

But that could seem like a relatively modest pinch. Alan Levenson, chief economist at T. Rowe Price, estimated that the Treasury’s tab for debt service this year would have been $221 billion higher if it had faced the same interest rates as it did last year.

The White House estimates that the government will have to borrow about $3.5 trillion more over the next three years. On top of that, the Treasury has to refinance, or roll over, a huge amount of short-term debt that was issued during the financial crisis. Treasury officials estimate that about 36 percent of the government’s marketable debt — about $1.6 trillion — is coming due in the months ahead.

To lock in low interest rates in the years ahead, Treasury officials are trying to replace one-month and three-month bills with 10-year and 30-year Treasury securities. That strategy will save taxpayers money in the long run. But it pushes up costs drastically in the short run, because interest rates are higher for long-term debt. 

Adding to the pressure, the Fed is set to begin reversing some of the policies it has been using to prop up the economy. Wall Street firms advising the Treasury recently estimated that the Fed’s purchases of Treasury bonds and mortgage-backed securities pushed down long-term interest rates by about one-half of a percentage point. Removing that support could in itself add $40 billion to the government’s annual tab for debt service.

This month, the Treasury Department’s private-sector advisory committee on debt management warned of the risks ahead.

“Inflation, higher interest rate and rollover risk should be the primary concerns,” declared the Treasury Borrowing Advisory Committee, a group of market experts that provide guidance to the government, on Nov. 4.

“Clever debt management strategy,” the group said, “can’t completely substitute for prudent fiscal policy.”

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:
Correction: November 24, 2009
An article on Monday about ballooning debt payments for the federal government misspelled, in some copies, the surname of an economist who noted that the bill for debt service would be even higher were it not for current low interest rates. He is Alan Levenson, not Levinson. And a chart with the continuation of the article misstated, in some editions, the size of debt payments due within a year that are currently paying no more than 1 percent in interest. It is $1.9 trillion, not $2.5 trillion.

WARNING OBJECTS MAY BE CLOSER THAN THEY APPEAR

Our money is allocated and distributed (i.e., spent) through Appropriations Bills passed by The U. S. Senate and signed by the President. The following is a VIP (very important point) our Government does not have any money, it takes our money from us, and if not enough, borrows more, then spends it! The "bailouts of 2008 and 2009" are absolutely deficit spending. Expect to see enormous deficits as we march toward the financial cliff. These enormous deficits merely pile up much more debt; and interest payments on that debt will become the largest item in the federal budget ... $1 out of every $12 dollars of the budget







2010 ELECTION CYCLE

WHAT!


US arrests three Africans in 'al-Qaeda cocaine sting'

A view of the Sahara desert in Mali (archive image)
The suspects are said to have offered to drive cocaine across the Sahara
A court in the US has for the first time charged suspected members of al-Qaeda with plotting to traffic cocaine in order to fund terrorism.
The three suspects, who are believed to be from Mali, were extradited to New York from Ghana. [WHO PAYS?]
They were arrested this week in an operation involving informants posing as Colombian leftist rebels. [SO HOW IS THE US INVOLVED?]
The suspects allegedly offered al-Qaeda protection for moving cocaine from West Africa through the Sahara to Spain. [I'M CONFUSED!]
They arrived in the US on Friday and were ordered to be held without bail after a brief court appearance. They did not enter pleas to charges of narco-terrorism conspiracy and conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists, US officials said. [ARE THEY BEING PROSECUTED AS U.S. CITIZENS?]
Washington has long been concerned about close ties between militants and the heroin trade in Afghanistan but the African case appears to show an expansion of both al-Qaeda's global operations and the US response, The Associated Press news agency reports. [WHO PAYS FOR THE LAIRS, I MEAN LAWYERS?]
Lebanese cover
The US authorities say the men are associates of al-Qaeda's North African branch and had told US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) informants that al-Qaeda could protect major shipments of cocaine in the region, driving the drugs by lorry through the Sahara desert.
All in their 30s, the suspects were named as Oumar Issa, Harouna Toure and Idriss Abelrahman.
Unsealed court papers say Mr Toure and Mr Abelrahman at one point claimed the profits from the drug business would "go to their people to support the fight for 'the cause'".
The DEA infiltrated the group by using informants posing as supporters of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or Farc. [WHAT ABOUT THE STREETS OF LA, DC, CHICAGO, NY, DETROIT?]
In particular, the DEA used a French-speaking informant posing as "a Lebanese radical committed to opposing the interests of the United States, Israel, and, more broadly, the West and its ideals", court papers say.
The informant claimed in secretly taped conversations that the Farc were looking for a secure means of smuggling drugs through western and northern Africa on the way to Europe.
During the negotiations, the al-Qaeda suspects allegedly offered to move cocaine from west Africa to north Africa for about 3,000 euros ($4,200) per kilo.
THELMA & LOUISE
[last lines]
Thelma Dickerson: [with a cliff in front of them and cops behind them]
Thelma Dickerson: OK, then listen; let's not get caught.
Louise Sawyer: What're you talkin' about?
Thelma Dickerson: Let's keep goin'!
Louise Sawyer: What d'you mean?
Thelma Dickerson: ...Go.
Thelma Dickerson: [Thelma nods ahead of them]
Louise Sawyer: You sure?
Thelma Dickerson: Yeah.
Max: [seeing Hal run toward the car] Hey!