Thursday, March 31, 2016

A DRONE DOESN'T ARREST TERRORISTS

YOU GOTTA ASK YOURSELF THE FOLLOWING QUESTION: WHY DOES OBAMA WANT TO CLOSE GITMO? WE DON'T NEED IT ANYMORE ... HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A DRONE ARREST ISIS OR A TERRORIST? PERHAPS THE NEW RULE AND POLICY IS "NO QUARTER!"
Pentagon to transfer a dozen Guantanamo inmates to two countries in the next few days in Obama’s final push to close the prison

NO ATTACKS ON AMERICAN SOIL (click here to see the number)
The Pentagon is set to transfer a dozen Guantanamo inmates to other countries in Barack Obama's final push to shut down the detention camp.

The first of the planned transfers are expected to take place in the next few days, with others taking place in the coming weeks.

At least two countries have agreed to take the prisoners and Congress has been notified about the plans, an official said.

The Pentagon is set to transfer a dozen Guantanamo inmates to other countries in Barack Obama's final push to shut down the detention camp

There are now 91 prisoners at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Most have been held without charge or trial for more than a decade, drawing international condemnation.

The most prominent of the prisoners set to be resettled is 37-year-old Tariq Ba Odah, a Yemeni man who has been on a long-term hunger strike.

His weight had dropped to 74 pounds from 148 and his legal team feared he could die of starvation, according to a report in December.

Lawyers for Ba Odah, who was cleared for transfer in 2009, had tried unsuccessfully to win his release on health and humanitarian grounds, but Pentagon officials said he was receiving proper care.

Obama, who last month presented Congress with a blueprint for closing the prison, is seeking to make good on his long-time pledge before he leaves office in January.

But he faces stiff opposition from many Republican lawmakers, as well as some of his fellow Democrats.
The most prominent of the prisoners set to be resettled is 37-year-old Tariq Ba Odah, a Yemeni man who has been on a long-term hunger strike

The Pentagon has notified Congress of its latest planned transfers from among the 37 detainees already cleared to be sent to their homelands or other countries, an official said.

All members of that group are expected to leave by the summer.

Obama's plan for closing down the facility calls for bringing the several dozen remaining prisoners to maximum-security prison in the United States.

But U.S. law bars such transfers to the mainland, and Obama has not ruled out doing so by use of executive action.

'I do not have a timeline on when particular detainees will be transferred from Guantanamo,' Commander Gary Ross, a Defense Department spokesman, said in a statement.

'However, the administration is committed to reducing the detainee population and to closing the detention facility responsibly.'

Lawyers for Ba Odah, who was cleared for transfer in 2009, had tried unsuccessfully to win his release on health and humanitarian grounds, but Pentagon officials said he was receiving proper care.

The plan to resettle about a dozen inmates was first reported by the Washington Post. The U.S. official declined to name the countries ready to take them in.

Ten Yemeni men were sent to Oman in January, while others were recently sent to Ghana, Bosnia and Montenegro.

The Obama administration has ruled out sending Yemenis, who make up the bulk of the remaining prisoners, to their homeland because it is engulfed in civil war and has an active Al Qaeda branch.

Guantanamo prisoners were rounded up overseas when the United States became embroiled in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan following the September 11 attacks.

The facility, opened by Obama's predecessor George W. Bush, came to symbolize aggressive detention practices that opened the United States to accusations of torture.

37 Guantanamo detainees have already been cleared to be sent to their homelands or other countries
Protesters demanded that Ba Odah should be freed, calling on Obama to fulfill his pledge to close the prison